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Hallelujah.

We normally end our “Christmas Music Extravaganza” the day after Christmas, but we decided to have one more day and after listening, we think you’ll know why.

At the time of the video below, Kaylee Rogers was 10 years old and attending the Killard House School in Donaghadee, County Down in northern Ireland.

According to the school’s website:

Killard House School is a co-educational Controlled School providing for children and young people with additional special educational needs. These include Moderate Learning Difficulties, Autistic Spectrum Disorder and associated Emotional barriers.

According to several sources, Kaylee has a mild form of autism.

Colin Millar, head teacher at Killard House, said: “For a child who came in P4 and would really talk, couldn’t really read out in class, to stand and perform in front of an audience is amazing.

“It takes a lot of effort on Kaylee’s part.”

The performance here is good not because of any “special needs,” but rather it is great because of Kaylee Rogers. It is difficult to believe how great this child’s voice is. Simply mind blowing.

The lyrics for this version of the song were written by the group Cloverton

(much, much more below the fold.)

I heard about this baby boy
Who comes to earth to bring us joy
And I just want to sing of this song to you
It goes like this
The fourth, the fifth
The minor fall, the major lift
With every breath I’m singing, “Hallelujah”

Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah

A couple came to Bethlehem
Expecting child, they searched the inn
To find a place for you were coming soon
There was no room for them to stay
So in a manger filled with hay
God’s only son was born, oh Hallelujah

Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah

The shepherds left their flocks by night
To see this baby wrapped in light
A host of angels led them all to you
It was just as the angels said
You’ll find him in a manger bed
And there you’ll meet your Savior, Hallelujah

Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah

A star shown bright out in the east
To Bethlehem, the wise-man three
Came many miles a journey long for you
Into the place at which you were
Their frankincense, gold, and myrrh
They came to you and cried out, “Hallelujah”

Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah

I know you came to rescue me
This baby boy would grow to be
A man who’d one day die for me and you
Our sins will drive the nails in you
That rugged cross, was my cross, too
And every breath you drew was “Hallelujah”

Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah

The original version of the song was written by Canadian Leonard Cohen (who was Jewish and thus the basis and many of the meanings behind the song) and we offer the original version performed brilliantly by Kurt Nilsen, Espen Lind, Askil Holm og and Alejandro Fuentes.

Now, I’ve heard there was a secret chord
That David played, and it pleased the Lord
But you don’t really care for music, do you?
It goes like this, the fourth, the fifth
The minor fall, the major lift
The baffled king composing hallelujah

Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah

Your faith was strong but you needed proof
You saw her bathing on the roof
Her beauty and the moonlight overthrew ya
She tied you to a kitchen chair
She broke your throne, and she cut your hair
And from your lips she drew the hallelujah

Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah

You say I took the name in vain
I don’t even know the name
But if I did, well really, what’s it to you?
There’s a blaze of light in every word
It doesn’t matter which you heard
The holy or the broken hallelujah

Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah

I did my best, it wasn’t much
I couldn’t feel, so I tried to touch
I’ve told the truth, I didn’t come to fool you
And even though it all went wrong
I’ll stand before the lord of song
With nothing on my tongue but hallelujah

Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah

In Hebrew, the word hallelujah means to rejoice in praising God. However, the numerous biblical references and religious symbols in Cohen’s song lead not to spiritual heights, but to Cohen’s secularism. It is a bitter lament about love and loss. Cohen, adept in scripture, simply taps the human condition described in the Bible in order to provide counsel to the brokenhearted.

Through Cohen’s imagery, including references to some of the most notorious women in the bible, we find that the word “hallelujah,” can mean so much more than just its religious context. “Hallelujah,” the song teaches us, is a refrain worthy of times of celebration, of mourning, of regret, of catharsis, and reconciliation. Cohen’s song tells a story of broken love, true love remembered and mourned, guilt, penance, and of finding peace in the vicissitudes of brokenness—themes with a myriad of applications and dimensions.

The performances of the original and the Cloverton version are uplifting.

As for Kaylee Rogers, she has some other videos out there including her singing “Silent Night,” “Somewhere Over the Rainbow,” “Never Enough” (from “The Greatest Showman”) and the wonderfully done (and perhaps appropriate) “This is Me” (also from “The Greatest Showman”):

Wow.

Just wow.

P.S.: one for the road. Here is Kaylee Rogers singing “Hallelujah” with the a cappella group Pentatonix:

P.P.S.: Told ya there was “much more below the fold,” didn’t we?



One Response to “Hallelujah.”

  1. Thomas Gaume says:

    What a great way to start the day, short work week, and year. Thank you!

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