search
top

We Thought This Was Someone’s Attempt At Satire. It’s Not.

Last Monday, White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki responded to a question concerning whether prices would rise if taxes were raised by the Biden administration.

When we read this elsewhere, we thought “that’s really bad satire. No one would deny economic laws on something like this.”

It wasn’t satire.

Transcript:

REPORTER: I want to ask you about what Republicans are pointing to in the analysis from the Joint Committee on Taxation. They say, according to — if I’ve read the chart correctly, more than 16 percent of taxpayers would see their taxes increase under the bill that’s approved by the House Ways and Means Committee. Will the President sign that bill if — as if — it is coming out of that committee? Or will he insist on the changes so that he will maintain his commitment that taxes won’t go up on people making $400,000 a year?

PSAKI: I have not looked at the document or the report that you have put out. Obviously, the President — or that you have referenced, I should say — that the Republicans put out.

Obviously, the President’s commitment remains not raising taxes for anyone making less than $400,000 a year. There are some — and I’m not sure if this is the case in this report — who argue that, in the past, companies have passed on these costs to consumers. I’m not sure if that’s the argument being made in this report. We feel that that’s unfair and absurd, and the American people would not stand for that. (emphasis ours)

Yeah, Americans will teach those businesses a lesson by not buying their goods like food, cars, gasoline…

That’ll teach them!

(Of course, less income from businesses will mean less in taxes and a need for a great tax increase, but we digress….)

The second problem in Psaki’s statement is this:

I have not looked at the document or the report that you have put out. Obviously, the President — or that you have referenced, I should say — that the Republicans put out.

The Joint Committee on Taxation is made up of members of the House and Senate.

The Joint Committee on Taxation is a nonpartisan committee of the United States Congress, originally established under the Revenue Act of 1926. The Joint Committee operates with an experienced professional staff of Ph.D economists, attorneys, and accountants, who assist Members of the majority and minority parties in both houses of Congress on tax legislation.

Here are the current members of the Committee and their party affiliation:

House

Richard Neal, Chairman
Democrat – Massachusetts

Lloyd Doggett
Democrat -Texas

Mike Thompson
Democrat California

Kevin Brady
Republican – Texas

Devin Nunes
Republican – California

Senate

Ron Wyden, Vice Chairman
Democrat – Oregon

Debbie Stabenow
Democrat – Michigan

Maria Cantwell
Democrat – Washington

Mike Crapo
Idaho

Chuck Grassley
Iowa

Somehow in the void between Psaki’s ears, a committee with 6 Democrats and 4 Republicans is writing reports that are from Republicans.

Next thing you know, the Biden administration will be floating the idea that spending $3.5 trillion on “infrastructure” won’t add to the deficit.

Nevermind.





Comments are closed.

top